Show/Hide

We’ve redesigned our website! Get details on our new look

Historic Landmarks

Print RSS
Overview

The Town of Cary supports local historic preservation by designating properties recognized as important historic resources worthy of preservation as Cary Historic Landmarks. On Oct. 30, 2008, the Cary Town Council adopted ordinances designating the Guess-White-Ogle House and the John Pullen Hunter House as Cary landmarks.  


Guess-White-Ogle House

215 S. Academy Street

oglehouse

Photo by Capital Area Preservation, Inc.

The Guess-White-Ogle House has been designated as a Cary Historic Landmark for its architectural significance. It is the finest, most intact and best preserved example of Queen Anne-style architecture in the Cary National Register Historic District. It is also an example of a dwelling that was expanded over time to reflect the prevailing architectural tastes of the day, adapting from an I-house in the Greek Revival-style to a Queen Anne structure between the mid- to late-nineteenth centuries. The architectural history of the Guess-Ogle House reflects a broad pattern of continual adaptation of vernacular house types that can be seen in other houses in Wake County and across the southeast. 


John Pullen Hunter House

311 S. Academy Street

pullenhouse

Photo by Capital Area Preservation, Inc.

The Dr. John Pullen Hunter House has been designated as a Cary Historic Landmark for its historical association with Dr. Hunter and his family, and for its architectural significance as one of the finest examples of a Craftsman bungalow in the Cary National Register Historic District, the only one constructed of brick. It also has the only intact chicken coop in the district. The family descended from Isaac Hunter, owner of a popular tavern in Wake County that was used as a landmark in establishing the city of Raleigh in 1788. Dr. Hunter constructed the house in the heart of downtown Cary in 1925. In addition to practicing medicine, Dr. Hunter served the community as a prominent civic leader.

Background

With the support of the property owners, the Wake County Historic Preservation Commission voted at their meeting on Aug. 12, 2008 to recommend to the Town of Cary that the Guess-White-Ogle House and the John Pullen Hunter House, both located on Academy Street in downtown Cary, be designated as Cary Historic Landmarks.

As outlined in G.S. 160A-400.6, the Cary Town Council held public hearings for each of the proposed landmarks at its Oct. 30, 2008 Council meeting. 
 
Landmark designation means any substantial exterior design changes to a designated landmark are subject to design review procedures of the Wake County Historic Preservation Commission.  Property owners may apply for an annual deferral of fifty percent of the property taxes for as long as the property is designated and retains significance and integrity.
 
Contact
Anna Readling, AICP
Senior Planner
Planning Department
Town of Cary
P.O. Box 8005
Cary, N.C. 27512-8005
(919) 469-4084
anna.readling@townofcary.org